Month: May 2014

Teaching Technology to the ‘Digital Native’

While I often opt to allow students to learn technology using available tutorials (for example, Prezi offers an array of video tutorials), for my WordPress assignments, I created a tutorial video using Screencast-o-matic as well as a document containing guidelines.

I did this for a few reasons. The first time I had students complete assignments in WordPress, I discovered that they had different levels of ability: some were well-versed in blogging while others had no experience writing online, and others were a little afraid of the technology.  The screencast introduces students to the basics of working with the text editor, which is common to a lot of online tools, as well as some of the unique features of WordPress blogs. Students can see how WordPress should work, and are better equipped to formulate questions when they encounter problems. I created a written set of guidelines with the same information so that students can use it as a quick guide.

Because the screencast is housed on my YouTube channel, I can also see how many students access the tutorial, giving me an idea of how prepared they are to put to use the information. Usually, I have students view the tutorial outside of class, and begin creating their drafts in computer lab.

Complexities of Culturally Constructed Gender Roles: Masculinity and Femininity in Taiko and “Tree With Deep Roots”

So-Yi, an important female character in "Tree With Deep Roots" who challenges gender roles

So-Yi, an important female character in “Tree With Deep Roots” who challenges gender roles

The male and female characters in Taiko and “Tree With Deep Roots” challenge gender roles of modern western civilization as well as the traditional roles of men and women in Japanese and Korean cultures, demonstrating the complexity of gender as a subjective cultural construct.

Overview

Though East Asian culture typically represents patriarchal societies, gender roles are not always clear. There is a general complexity regarding gender, which is evident in both male and female characters in Eiji Yoshikawa’s Taiko as well as the television K-Drama series “Tree With Deep Roots.” In contrast with the modern Western view of masculinity, male characters in Taiko and “Tree With Deep Roots” show their power through intellect and emotion, balancing physical strength and discipline. Those who do not demonstrate a sense of self-control or understanding are seen as much less powerful figures. According to Vladimir Tikhonov, “any attempt to construct an image of unchanging, singular, traditional masculinity will likely be an exercise in essentialist overgeneralizing” (1037). The same holds true for femininity; while the typical role of East Asian women in the time period can be defined as dependent, submissive and reserved, both works feature women who challenge these roles, which further complicates East Asian philosophies regarding gender. Both male and female characters serve rather untraditional roles in the context of their genders, not only in comparison with Western culture but also within the confines of Japanese and Korean cultures, denoting the true complexity of gender as a social and cultural construct.

Masculinity in Taiko

According to Donald Levine, “the Japanese have traditionally referred to those who behave with untamed violence, not as real men, but as barbarians or wild beasts. The attitude toward a man who manifests physical strength alone is just as negative as that toward an effete courtier” (Levine 167). While gender role is a malleable concept in Eiji Yoshikawa’s Taiko, male characters still demonstrate their masculinity through physical and emotional brutality; however, the most influential male figures express an intellect defined by their ability to balance emotional vulnerability with harsh stoicism, recognizing where each is appropriate. Thus, masculinity is defined much differently than in Western culture, revealing that there is more to a man than his physical strength; power develops from intellect and the ability to show emotion.

It is clear that the world of Taiko is a culture mainly run by men, where female characters have little say in the direction their lives take. Tokichiro notes in Book Two that a woman’s “happiness depends on the man she marries” (141), explaining the power associated with masculinity. When Oichi reunites with her brother (Nobunaga), she refuses to acknowledge Nobunaga as anything “more than the enemy general who had killed her husband” (421). Oichi’s outburst of emotion for her late husband infuriates Nobunaga, causing him to display his (and his sister’s lack of) power by sending Oichi away. Nobunaga’s authoritative masculinity is evident in his ability to denounce his sister and disregard her emotions entirely. In this way, Nobunaga demonstrates an unsympathetic masculinity, acting out of passionate distaste rather than evaluating the situation with understanding or intelligence. Yoshikawa paints a vivid picture of masculinity regarding physical strength insomuch as the samurai is the archetype of masculinity, thus correlating violence with the quintessential man.

However, it is not just physical or emotional severity that make a man, nor is it mere masculinity that allows a man to successfully rule over and protect a group of people in Japanese culture. The most powerful men are those with incredible intellect, which is apparent when considering military strategists and the art of war.  Though the shogun Yoshiaki was born into power and represents masculinity as a military leader, he lacks the intellect necessary to earn respect as a male figure. When Nobunaga wants to kill Yoshiaki out of rage, it is Hideyoshi who evaluates the situation and deems it inappropriate to act on emotional disturbances, though he acknowledges and validates Nobunaga’s anger.

Portrait of Hideyoshi

Portrait of Hideyoshi

Hideyoshi demonstrates intellectual stoicism even when he makes a promise to commit seppuku if he is unable to finish building the castle wall in three days. While Nobunaga and others are worried he will not be able to finish in time, Hideyoshi knows not to waste time feeling anxious, Instead, he designs a plan to “make the laborers on the construction site work hard… using their strength to the full” in order to complete the task (157). Rather than utilizing threats or violence, Hideyoshi uses his intellect to inspire the workers. Despite his ability to drop emotion and fearlessly take on a life-or-death situation, Hideyoshi is not invulnerable to emotion; the scene in which he reads and cries over a letter from his mother is not an exceptionally masculine representation of him, because “it was the upbringing of a samurai not to let anyone see his tears” (149). However, it is noteworthy that Hideyoshi chooses this particular scene, which does not have high-stake implications, to become vulnerable. Still, he does not allow his vulnerability to negatively affect his work. Taiko presents an insightful perspective of the impact intellect and emotional control have on masculinity and power in Japanese samurai culture, which makes way for Hideyoshi’s rise to power as Taiko.

Female Characters in Taiko

 While Hideyoshi presents a nontraditional paradigm of masculinity, the female characters of Taiko further complicate the matter of gender. The first female character mentioned, Hideyoshi’s mother Onaka, presents a version of femininity very different from what is expected in that her marriage to Yaemon undergoes extenuating circumstances. Onaka serves a more important role, taking care of her two children and taking on all the household duties because her husband Yeamon, a samurai who was injured in battle, is utterly useless. This goes against the historically “reinforced notion of patriarchal authority” (Hsia and Scanzoni 311) because she has more power in the household than her crippled husband. However, she does not simply take on a purely masculine personality; “the thought of war made her shudder” (Yoshikawa 7), showing that she does not have the violent tendencies of a masculine figure. Nevertheless, Onaka “had one bright hope; to bring up Hiyoshi and make him the kind of son who would grow up quickly and be able to present her husband with at least a bit of sake every day” (Yoshikawa 7). Onaka aims to make her son’s life the best it can be; however, she complicates her motherly role when she remarries after Yaemon passes away. While her marriage to the abusive and alcoholic samurai Chikuami shows that she can endure hardship in order to provide financially for her children, an indication of strength, so too does it show that she plays the role of a submissive wife. The juxtaposition of her two roles in marriage complicates her womanhood.

A depiction of Hideyoshi with his wife.

A depiction of Hideyoshi with his wife.

Another female character in Taiko who displays an ambiguous femininity is Nene, Hideyoshi’s first wife. While Nene presents the portrait of a lovely, feminine woman whose father has a say in her marriage and future, she also serves an important role as Hideyoshi’s wife throughout his rise to his position as Taiko. Before they are married, Hideyoshi thinks of Nene in the context of someone who will be kind to his mother and someone who would “help [him] behind the scenes, look after [him] with devotion, and excuse [his] faults” (Yoshikawa 216). Though this is his romanticized idea of Nene as a wife, it is true that she assists him in all this when she does take on the role of his wife. “She works hard and she’s gentle” (Yoshikawa 216), proving that though she is a traditionally feminine character, she also has leadership qualities that are emblematic of masculine figures.

Masculinity in “Tree With Deep Roots”

King Sejong in "Tree With Deep Roots," showing emotion.

King Sejong in “Tree With Deep Roots,” showing emotion.

The television K-drama series “Tree With Deep Roots” further pushes the boundaries of traditional gender roles in an East Asian society; male characters follow the Korean tradition that “legitimate violence was the last resort for Confucian virtue (Tikhonov 1045). This challenges the notion that physical strength and brute force are important qualities for a masculine leader because the transition from the harsh King Taejong to the intellectual King Sejong proves to be a positive step toward a more masculine and favorable leader. King Sejong is the perfect example of a leader who maintains power via intellect and humility. His desire to give power to the common people by creating a new Korean alphabet called Hangul shows that he does not wish to simply keep all the power to himself, but would rather distribute power among the masses, proving his loyalty to his people. In the opening episodes of “Tree With Deep Roots,” Taejong tells Sejong that he should develop a way to keep power to himself, showing that he is selfish. Additionally, Taejong demonstrates the violent behaviors of a traditionally masculine figure, but exemplifies why pointless violence and brutality do not denote a strong, masculine leader.

While King Taejong views Sejong’s desire to distribute power as a weakness, Sejong’s masculinity is evident in that he does not fear sharing power; a weak king fears that power will be taken from him, while a strong king can distribute power while still remaining in control. In episode 19, King Sejong meets Jeong Gi Joon, the leader of the secret society of scholars called “Hidden Root” and discusses why he wants to give power to the people. While both men are intellectual leaders, Jeong Gi Joon shows weakness in acknowledging his fear that the common people might want to take over, challenging the notion that all intellectuals are masculine. However, the fact that the two most powerful and masculine men in the series (Sejong and Jeong Gi Joon) both owe their influence not only to the families they were born into but also to their intellectual abilities speaks to the importance of intelligence. Therefore, masculinity is not easily defined, but rather a concept constructed based on multiple societal ideals.

Jeong Gi Joon, a powerful intellect and leader of "Hidden Root"

Jeong Gi Joon, a powerful intellect and leader of “Hidden Root”

Female Characters in “Tree With Deep Roots”

 Though male figures make up the majority of characters in the television series “Tree With Deep Roots,” there are notable female characters who push the boundaries of traditional gender roles, specifically So-Yi. While So-Yi demonstrates the traditional ideals of a Japanese woman insomuch as her demeanor is quiet, demure and ladylike, she is far from conventional regarding her significance and commitment toward furthering the development of the Korean alphabet. At the end of the first episode, So-Yi blames herself for contributing to the death of Sejong’s father-in-law after reading a letter that is switched out for a letter of condemnation. Realizing her mistake in judgment, So-Yi vows to remain mute. The punishment she gives herself adheres to the traditional description of femininity in that it is nonviolent and causes her to seem submissive. However, she shows great self-control and power in her ability to stick to her word, a quality typically demonstrative of a strong male leader. According to Vladimir Tikhonov, Korean masculinity is characterized by “Confucian values of self-discipline and sacrifice” (1036); therefore, So-Yi’s sacrifice of her own voice is more of a masculine quality than it is feminine. While going mute is not the same as committing seppuku, So-Yi makes a sacrifice as a consolation for her mistake. She does this on her own account rather than as a result of being ordered to do so, showing honor and self-discipline, proving that she is not a standard symbol of femininity.

Scene from Episode 6 when King Sejong and So-Yi engage in an emotional confrontation.

Scene from Episode 6 when King Sejong and So-Yi engage in an emotional confrontation.

According to Donald Levine, “proficient calligraphy was the main” aspect of “personal culture” that contributed to the ideal male leader in East Asian culture (Levine 168), which confuses So-Yi’s gender role due to her intellectual prowess and ability to write. As a close advisor to King Sejong, So-Yi goes on to utilize her unique memory, ability to read and write, and overall incredible intelligence to carry out secretive missions and to assist King Sejong in his pursuit to create the Korean alphabet. So-Yi shows that whether male or female, loyalty goes a long way and provides power. Additionally, she exhibits emotional strength; in the middle of episode six, So-Yi writes to King Sejong that it is not his fault that her family was killed. While she remains calm in this scene, Sejong is overcome with emotion, becomes angry and cries. So-Yi demonstrates a sense of stoicism that violates the traditional reaction expected for women at the time. While So-Yi challenges gender roles as a woman in Korean society by holding a leadership position and demonstrating masculine qualities of self-control, power and stoicism, Queen Soheon, the wife of King Sejong also serves a nontraditional female role.

In the first episode of “Tree With Deep Roots,” Queen Soheon asks King Sejon to spare her father’s life, going against his own father’s corrupt orders. In doing so, she displays great courage and shows that a woman can request a favor from a man, which goes against the stereotype that women must be submissive and silent. In the second episode, the two converse about the fate of her father. While it is notable that she has influence on her husband’s actions and intentions, he poses a question: would she rather save her father or maintain her power as queen? Though not an easy decision, it is significant that she has the option of making the decision for herself at all regarding her own position as well as the life of another man. She utilizes her female qualities of loyalty toward her husband and her ability to keep calm and quiet as a means of maintaining her power. Her feminine compassion for her father drives her to behave in a more masculine way, imposing her influence on her husband to try to save lives. In doing so, she contributes to the fact that So-Yi is still alive; thus, Queen Soheon is a critical aspect of the development of the Korean alphabet insomuch as without her perseverance toward saving her father, So-Yi might not be alive to help King Sejong.

Conclusion

According to Jason Karlin, “within gendered representations, masculinity and femininity serve as signifiers of difference. Representations are inflected masculine or feminine as a way of expressing judgments related to questions of power and politics” (42). While this serves as a starting point for understanding gender in the contexts of Taiko and “Tree With Deep Roots,” it is clear that no character can completely represent all that is masculine or feminine due to the fact that each character is nuanced in their behaviors and attitude related to power as well as their manner of achieving it. Thus, gender roles are extremely complicated to define, especially when there are so many varying ideas of what the socially accepted gender roles are.

 

Works Cited

Hsia, Hsiao-Chuan and John H. Scanzoni. “Rethinking the Roles of Japanese Women.” Journal of Comparative Family Studies 27.2 (1996): 309-329. JSTOR. Web. 8 May 2014.

Karlin, Jason G. “The Gender of Nationalism: Competing Masculinities in Meiji Japan.” The Society for Japanese Studies 28.1 (2002): 41-77. JSTOR. Web. 8 May 2014.

Levine, Donald. “The Masculinity Ethic and the Spirit of Warriorhood in Ethiopian and Japanese Cultures.” International Journal of Ethiopian Studies 2.1/2 (2006): 161-177. JSTOR. Web. 8 May 2014.

Tikhonov, Vladimir. “Masculinizing the Nation: Gender Ideologies in Traditional Korea and in the 1890s-1900s Korean Enlightenment Discourse.” The Journal of Asian Studies 66.4 (2007): 1029-1065. JSTOR. Web. 8 May 2014.

Tree With Deep Roots. Writ. Lee Jung Myung. Dir. Jang Tao Yoo and Shin Kyung Soo. SBS, 2011. DramaFever.

Yoshikawa, Eiji. Taiko: An Epic Novel of War and Glory in Feudal Japan. New York: Kodansha USA, 2012. Print.

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Complex Gender Roles in “Tree With Deep Roots”

Scene from Episode 6 when King Sejong and So-Yi engage in an emotional confrontation. Sejong shows emotional vulnerability.

Scene from Episode 6 when King Sejong and So-Yi engage in an emotional confrontation. Sejong shows emotional vulnerability.

The television K-drama series “Tree With Deep Roots” pushes the boundaries of traditional gender roles in an East Asian society; male characters prove intellectualism to be imperative, while women play pivotal leadership roles. However, both genders demonstrate a complex variety of attributes.

The transition from the harsh King Taejong to the intellectual King Sejong proves to be a positive step toward a more masculine and favorable leader. King Sejong is the perfect example of a leader who maintains power via intellect and humility. His desire to give power to the common people by creating a new alphabet shows that he does not wish to simply keep all the power to himself, but would rather distribute power among the masses, proving his loyalty to his people. In the opening episodes, Taejong tells Sejong that he should develop a way to keep power to himself, showing that he is selfish. Additionally, Taejong demonstrates the violent behaviors of a traditionally masculine figure, but exemplifies why pointless violence and brutality do not denote a strong, masculine leader. While King Taejong views Sejong’s desire to distribute power as a weakness, Sejong’s masculinity is evident in that he does not fear sharing power; a weak king fears that power will be taken from him, while a strong king can distribute power while still remaining in control. In episode 19, King Sejong meets Jeong Gi Joon, the leader of “Hidden Root” discussing why he wants to give power to the people. While both men are intellectual leaders, Jeong Gi Joon shows weakness in acknowledging his fear that the common people might want to take over, challenging the notion that all intellectuals are masculine. Therefore, masculinity is not easily defined, but rather a concept constructed based on multiple societal ideals.

Though male figures make up the majority of characters, there are notable female characters who push the boundaries of traditional gender roles, specifically So-Yi. While So-Yi demonstrates the traditional ideals of a Japanese woman insomuch as her demeanor is quiet, demure and ladylike, she is far from conventional regarding her significance and commitment toward furthering the development of the Korean alphabet. At the end of the first episode, So-Yi blames herself for contributing to the death of Sejong’s father-in-law after reading a letter that is switched out for a letter of condemnation. Realizing her mistake in judgment, So-Yi vows to remain mute. The punishment she gives herself adheres to the traditional description of femininity in that it is nonviolent and causes her to seem submissive. However, she shows great self-control and power in her ability to stick to her word, a quality typically demonstrative of a strong male leader. As a close advisor to King Sejong, So-Yi goes on to utilize her unique memory, ability to read and write, and overall incredible intelligence to carry out secretive missions and to assist King Sejong in his pursuit to create the Korean alphabet. So-Yi shows that whether male or female, loyalty goes a long way and provides power.

Male and female characters in “Tree With Deep Roots” behave in ways that both adhere to as well as conflict with the traditional expectations of gender in their society, showing that gender is not easily defined.

Works Cited

Tree With Deep Roots. Writ. Lee Jung Myung. Dir. Jang Tao Yoo and Shin Kyung Soo. SBS, 2011. DramaFever.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

I’ll Make a Man Out of You: Explorations of Masculinity in Taiko and Tree with Deep Roots

Samurai from feudal Japan

Samurai from feudal Japan

Societal norms often vary across cultures. Traditionally, Western ideals of masculinity encourage stoicism and physical strength. East Asian texts and popular media, such as Taiko and Tree with Deep Roots, challenge these norms, asserting an East Asian view of masculinity that values emotion and intellect over reckless and repressed behavior.

Introduction:

Both Taiko and Tree with Deep Roots present depictions of masculinity that challenge Western norms of what it means to be a “real man.” Readers of Taiko see characters like Chikuami, who has physical strength but lacks emotional stability (he is an alcoholic), juxtaposed with Hideyoshi and Nobunaga, who seem to balance both aggression and emotional intelligence relatively well. In Tree with Deep RootsKing Sejong is portrayed as an emotional and intelligent man, both of which give him strength as a leader; his father, on the other hand, relies solely on brute force and is portrayed as a negative example of masculinity. Discovering and analyzing the representations of masculinity in these works is an important aspect of cross-cultural understanding that directly impacts our interpretations of both these texts and texts that we encounter in our own Western culture.

Taiko:

Toward the beginning of Book Two, Tokichiro becomes quite emotional after receiving a letter from his mother. Yoshikawa claims that “Tokichiro cried and read the letter over and over. The master of the house was not supposed to let his servants see him cry. Moreover, it was the upbringing of a samurai not to let anyone see his tears. But Tokichiro was not like that” (149). This description of Tokichiro’s highly emotional state at first seems to claim that samurai, as paragons of masculinity, should avoid displays of emotion. However, readers are presented with other examples of samurai emotion later in the text. At the conclusion of Nagamasa’s funeral ceremony, for instance, Yoshikawa writes: “Someone began to weep, and soon everyone was affected…the armored men hung their heads and averted their eyes. Not one of them could look up” (405). In this situation, one in which warriors are faced with the death of their leader and their clan, the role of the retainer in mourning seems to take precedence over that of the stoic samurai. Similarly, Tokichiro’s emotions upon receiving his mother’s letter are acceptable because of the value placed on family relationships. While both Tokichiro and Nagamasa’s men clearly have physical strength and knowledge of the art of war, they are viewed in an even more positive light when these attributes are coupled with emotional intelligence; they are not indulgently emotional, but rather they know when and how to properly display their feelings.

Readers of Taiko are also presented with foil characters that serve to emphasize ideals of masculinity in Japanese culture. Chikuami, Hiyoshi’s stepfather, is characterized as a man who cannot balance his own physical strength with intellect and emotion. He was once a samurai but, as his story unfolds in the first few books of the text, he struggles with a drinking problem and an inability to provide steady income. In his case, brute strength is not enough to make him a true man; he is not respected by many people, especially his wife and his stepson. Readers also see the shogun, Yoshiaki, as a less than respectable male character. He has military and political power by virtue of his birth into the shogunate, but he lacks emotional maturity and virtuous intellect. His masculinity is not one to be idolized, and it can be argued that this contributes greatly to his downfall. By providing these examples, Yoshikawa seeks to highlight the positive aspects of masculinity that other characters (Tokichiro, Nagamasa, etc.) possess.

Donald Levine argues that these Japanese cultural norms are dependent on historical and social factors that have shaped societal expectations throughout Japan’s history. As a country almost constantly on guard against colonial powers, both from Europe and from Asia, Japan has often needed to develop a mentality of “martial readiness” for war and defense (Levine 164). This explains not only the presence of the samurai class in Japan, but also the pervasive mentality of the samurai as seen in Taiko; Levine says that men who prepare themselves constantly for war must learn that physical aggression cannot be a constant and that values such as honor, diligence, and politeness emerge as natural counterparts. In this way, masculinity in Japan became linked to military strength and the ability to effectively maintain and manage one’s near-constant sense of war. This theory also helps readers understand the downfall of characters like Chikuami, who has been removed from  his samurai status and is therefore dealing with misplaced aggression and no sense of honor or dignity to counterbalance it.

Tree with Deep Roots:

In the Korean television drama Tree with Deep Roots, viewers are exposed to many male characters who exhibit various characteristics of masculinity. In the first episode, Lee Do (Sejong) openly displays his emotions to both the men and women around him. When he learns that his father-in-law is going to be killed by King Taejong for dissention, he is distraught over the choice he must make between stopping his father’s actions and allowing him to kill his wife’s family. Sejong never cries openly, but his eyes are clearly full of tears, and he is unafraid of embracing the fact that he is upset by the situation. At approximately 1:55 in the following clip, we see his emotion and hesitation as he goes to speak to his wife:

While some characters see Sejong’s emotional nature as a detriment to his leadership abilities, it is clear that his value for intellect and thought over brute force make him a powerful leader.

Just as Chikuami and Yoshiaki serve as foils to Hideyoshi and Nobunaga in Taiko, King Taejong serves to contrast Sejong’s emotional intelligence in the first few episodes of Tree with Deep Roots. The King is reckless and harsh, demanding death and punishment without much explanation and without consideration of those who will be affected by it. He denies the validity of Sejong’s alphabet and argues that his puzzles and games will never make him a great king, saying that instead Sejong should focus on consolidating power to himself and using it to get his way.

King Taejong tells Sejong that he must be the only one with power

King Taejong tells Sejong that he must be the only one with power

This is the kind of masculinity that Taejong advocates for, in direct contrast to Sejong’s subdued, intelligent ways. As the drama continues, we see that Sejong’s rise to power and prominence are aided by his willingness to show emotion and pursue the creation of Hangul. He understands the power that words have, both in conversation and throughout a culture, and he seeks to reunite his people by giving them words that they can use for themselves. This theme of an intelligent man who values knowledge and respectable rule continues throughout the drama and is discussed explicitly in episode 19, when King Sejong meets Jung Gi Joon in person.

Tree with Deep Roots also presents us with the character of young Ddol Bok early on in the drama to establish a sense of untamed aggression and masculinity. The young boy who constantly defends his father by beating up anyone who talks poorly of him is seen as wild and unruly, someone to be feared and not respected. Ddol Bok must learn to harness his anger and control it, tempering it with age and intelligence when he becomes Kang Chae-yoon and begins investigating Tree with Deep Roots. The transformation that we see in Ddol Bok is meant to demonstrate the power of not only age but also emotional stability: the young boy is never able to accomplish much other than beating people up and getting in trouble, whereas his older, more stable self is capable of much greater and worthy deeds. 

Ddol Bok

Ddol Bok

As Vladimir Tikhonov reminds us, we must be careful when attempting to construct a singular image of Koren (or any) masculinity; such an attempt, he claims, would be “an exercise in essentialist overgeneralizing” (1037). Instead, examining the complexities of masculinity presented in Tree with Deep Roots allows us to understand more of the dynamics that exist between different groups and the ways in which they exhibit masculinity. For example, the perception of Hidden Root can be quite different among viewers, especially when considering the ways that members display their own maleness. In some ways, Jung Gi Joon and the Hidden Root are similar to Sejong; they seem to balance both strength and power with their own intellect, understanding Confucian ideals and the necessity of temperance over action in some cases. While they are meant to be seen as “the enemy” of the drama, their somewhat-noble masculinity makes them difficult to hate entirely. Compared to a man like King Taejong, who sets an early example of negative leadership and masculinity, some members of Hidden Root could be considered respectable. This makes the interactions between King Sejon and Jung Gi Joon in episode 19 interesting, as we see two variations of essentially ideal masculinity interacting and discussing power, leadership, and the role of language.

Jung Gi Joon

Jung Gi Joon

Conclusion:

It is difficult to discuss masculinity in broad terms. The idea of maleness is nuanced, accompanied by centuries of cultural norms and expectations that cannot be easily understood without a great deal of context. In some East Asian cultures, these norms are influenced by a history of colonization and religious change that created a need to simultaneously value power and emotional stability over singular brute force. The Japanese novel Taiko demonstrates this through characters like Hideyoshi and Nobunago, who, while not perfect, are meant to be examples of a balanced masculinity. Both rulers are capable militarily and know the value of physical force; however, their status as samurai impacts the ways they use this power and causes them to temper it with honor, dignity, and politeness (in some cases). In this way, they defy many of the norms we know of what it means to be male. Similarly, the Korean television drama Tree with Deep Roots provides viewers with a complex perspective of masculinity. Characters range from the tyrannical King Taejong, who sees consolidation of power and lack of emotions as strength, to King Sejong, who values language and intelligence as a necessary complement to his political and military power. Through the complexity of their characters, these pieces of Japanese and Korean culture paint a picture of masculinity that is more than what we typically see in Western ideals.

 

Works Cited:

Levine, Donald. “The Masculinity Ethic and the Spirit of Warriorhood in Ethiopian and Japanese Cultures.” International Journal of Ethiopian Studies 2.1/2 (2006): 161-177. JSTOR. Web. 12 March 2014.

Tikhonov, Vladimir. “Masculinizing the Nation: Gender Ideologies in Traditional Korea and in the 1890s–1900s Korean Enlightenment Discourse.” The Journal of Asian Studies 66.4 (2007): 1029-1065. JSTOR. Web. 27 March 2014.

Yoshikawa, Eiji. Taiko: An Epic Novel of War and Glory in Feudal Japan. Tokyo: Kodansha International Ltd., 1992. Print.

 

Images (in order of appearance):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db /MuromachiSamurai1538.jpg

http://dramahaven.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10 /tree-song-joong-ki-caps.jpg

https://thetalkingcupboard.files.wordpress.com/2011 /10/tree-with-deep-roots-ep-01-avi_000887987.jpg

http://thetalkingcupboard.files.wordpress.com/2011 /12/tree-with-deep-roots-ep-18-avi_003824691.jpg

 

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Tree with deep roots, hangul and korea under imperial japan

King Sejong

King Sejong is a national hero in Korea for his role in developing the hangul alphabet.

The strains put on Korea during its period as a colonial holding of Japan in the first half of the twentieth century were many, though none was so horrid as the attempt to erase the Korean language. Memories of this injustice are central to the popularity of Tree with Deep Roots.

As can be seen in Tree with Deep Roots, the struggle to create and implement an efficient and accessible alphabet for the Korean language was no small undertaking. King Sejong, who ruled the Korean peninsula in the first half of the fifteenth century, implemented the Hangul alphabet in order to elevate the status of his people and give them a viable means of expressing their culture without having to master Chinese, then the official writing form in Korea. Sejong gave Koreans an official identity, as use of the Chinese alphabet had the effect of controlling Korean affairs. In episode 15 of Tree with Deep Roots the ease of implementation of hangul is demonstrated, as even a simple farmer can master it in a matter of days or even hours. Episode 19 gives some insight into Sejong’s motivations, as he speaks about his desire to see hangul give a voice to the people and a way to participate in their governance without having to go through corruptible bureaucratic channels. When Sejong ultimately prevails over the Hidden Root secret-society seeking to prevent the rise of hangul, a Korean national identity is formed, one which the Japanese seek to rip away after absorbing Korea into their empire in 1910.

After the wars of 1894-95 and 1905, “Japanese leaders believed that her success, and her sacrifices in [these] two wars, gave her the right to control Korea,” and promptly began acting on this position (Lone 145). In 1910 this was made official, as “a treaty of annexation transferring all rights of [Korean] sovereignty to Japan’s emperor,” making the peninsula a colony ruled by Imperial Japan (Brundnoy 161). For Korea, “a small country with no armed force worth the name,” and no international support forthcoming, “the obvious course seemed to be to accept Japanese control,” (Lone 172). At first the Japanese were relatively benevolent, choosing to at least pay lip-service to equality among Koreans and Japanese (while brutally crushing signs of resistance). By 1938, now embroiled in war with China once more, Japan began its barbarity in Korea in earnest, “placing emphasis on Japanization of Koreans,” through an “attempted annihilation of Korean consciousness,” (Brudnoy 186). To destroy the identity King Sejong had created some 500 years earlier the Japanese attacked hangul itself, as “the government abolished Korean-language instruction in all primary and secondary schools… [and] the use of Japanese became mandatory there and on the streets,” with harsh penalties meted out to violators (Ibid). This attempt by the Japanese to erase the essence of what it is to be Korean during their imperial period is still a major source of tension for the two countries today, and makes Tree with Deep Roots all the more poignant for Korean audiences.

Works Cited

Brudnoy, David. “Japan’s Experiment in Korea.” Monumenta Nipponica 25.1/2 (1970): 155-195. JSTOR. Web. 18 Mar 2014.

Lone, Stewart. “The Japanese Annexation of Korea 1910: The Failure of East Asian Co-Prosperity.” Modern Asian Studies 25.1 (1991): 143-173. JSTOR. Web. 18 Mar 2014.

Tree with Deep Roots. Writ. Lee Jung Myung. Dir. Jang Tao Yoo and Shin Kyung Soo. SBS, 2011. DramaFever.

 
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